Glo-worms packaging, with one HELL of a bold claim

Glo-worms packaging; hmmmm that is one hell of a bold claim....

Nope this post is not about a major lifestyle change but about all the guy lines on our arctic bell tent. With roughly 20 lines, each thicker than a standard guy line, in a nice camouflaged olive-green, reaching several meters out from the tent we get a lot of trips taking place around our tent (mostly other campers at midnight on the way to and from the loos). Here I describe how we used Glo-worms to make the guy lines more visible.

Glo-worms tend to work their way down the guy line and hide in the grass

Glo-worms tend to work their way down the guy line and hide in the grass

We chose Glo-worms purely for cost reasons; on my other tents I’ve fitted reflective guy lines for the last 7 years or so but due to the diameter and length of the guy lines on our Bell tent the cost of fitting reflective line is quite high (not enormous but high enough that we want to put it off for a bit).

Glo-worms are little sleeves that have two halves, one glows in the dark and one is reflective, you thread them over your guy lines. To fit them to our tent we had to untie the end loops of the guy lines as the knot was too big to pass through the little sleeve, but that was ok as it means they won’t go missing and we only had to do it once. On the main door guy I added a 2nd one half way up just beside the clam-cleat; when doing this make sure you push it all the way up to the knot side of the adjuster, otherwise it will keep getting caught in the adjuster as you set the tent up.

When fitting near clam-cleats or other adjusters make sure to fit next to the knot, not the adjusting side

When fitting near clam-cleats or other adjusters make sure to fit next to the knot, not the adjusting side

When fitted they are like little flags, and do help you to pick out the guy lines (we had very few night-time trips from our fellow campers during the spring bank holiday weekend this year). However with our tent they had a tendency to slide down to the ground during the course of the day and ended up half hidden in the grass. It would probably have been better to have fitted them half way up, but then people would have found it hard to spot the end of most of the guy lines (they run at a shallow angle and are very long).

One day we will shell out for full glow in the dark reflective guy lines, but for now these combined with the glow-in-the-dark clam-cleats we use should keep most people from tripping-up, and they are not too bad for £20 (roughly what it cost us for 20 direct from the manufacturer).